Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS)

Many Americans experience digestive issues from time to time, but some individuals contend with painful digestive symptoms that frequently disrupt the progression of their day. Occasional stomach upsets aren’t uncommon, but it’s not normal to suffer from digestive issues on a regular basis. Unfortunately we are seeing a rise in digestive issues, even amongst infants and children.

If you find yourself experiencing abdominal pain, cramping, diarrhea, or other digestive problems on a regular basis, you might be dealing with IBS.

What is IBS?

Irritable Bowel Syndrome, also known as IBS, is a gastrointestinal disorder that affects the bowel and digestive tract. Individuals who suffer from IBS often experience an array of unpleasant digestive issues. Though IBS is not deadly, the resulting damage can cause life long health issues and seriously affect an individuals quality of life.

IBS is worrisome for many people who suffer from it, and the toll of unremitting IBS can lead to nutrient malabsorption, lowered immunity, neuromuscular disorders as well as depression and anxiety. Underlying triggers of IBS can create bigger problems such as systemic inflammation and even autoimmunity.

What Causes IBS?

An exact cause of Irritable Bowel Syndrome is unclear, but there are several factors that can contribute to the development of IBS. These factors include miscommunication between the gut and brain, overly sensitive nerves in the GI tract, microbiome imbalances, immune system disorders, bile dysfunction and issues with the way GI muscles contract and release to move food through the digestive system.

Additionally, stress, anxiety, and an individual’s diet may play a role in triggering the symptoms of IBS.

IBS Symptoms

Several digestive symptoms affect individuals with IBS, and the most common of these symptoms include:
M

Diarrhea or constipation

M

Straining

M

Excessive gas

M

Harder or looser stools than usual

M

Abdominal pain

M

Bloating

M

Mucus in fecal matter

M

Diarrhea or constipation

M

Straining

M

Excessive gas

M

Harder or looser stools than usual

M

Abdominal pain

M

Bloating

M

Mucus in fecal matter

IBS Symptoms in Women

For women, the symptoms of IBS may include those listed above, but may also include the following health issues:
M

Intensifying PMS

M

Loss of appetite

M

Mood swings

M

Pain during intercourse

M

Fatigue

M

Pelvic pain

M

Intensifying PMS

M

Loss of appetite

M

Mood swings

M

Pain during intercourse

M

Fatigue

M

Pelvic pain

Additionally, IBS may increase a woman’s risk of developing endometriosis, infertility and re-occurring miscarriages, or experiencing pelvic organ prolapse.

IBS Symptoms in Children

For infants and children, the symptoms of IBS may also include those listed above, but may also contribute to behavioral and development issues as well. Research has shown that children who have parents that suffer with IBS are at a higher risk of developing the condition themselves.

Can IBS Cause Constipation?

Yes, IBS can cause constipation in some individuals. Irritable Bowel Syndrome with Constipation (IBS-C) is actually the most common type of IBS, as it affects nearly half of IBS patients. Bowel irritability does not always result in diarrhea, as issues along the digestive tract can either greatly increase stool transit or slow it down.

Can IBS Cause Diarrhea?

Also yes. IBS can cause diarrhea in some individuals. It’s a common symptom that individuals with IBS face, and it’s often one of the most difficult and disruptive symptoms to deal with. Irritable Bowel Syndrome with Diarrhea (IBS-D) is often what comes to mind when most people think about IBS, but the key symptom of IBS can fluctuate between diarrhea and constipation in some patients.

IBS Treatment

At Peak Vitality, after speaking to one of our specialty case managers and ordering the correct labs, our team of clinicians will review the patient’s health history and labs findings in order to design a care plan that meets the patient’s unique needs.

To do so, it is essential to determine all the current underlying IBS triggers so that the treatment plan is individualized to meet the patient’s unique needs.

An effective nutritional plan is used in combination with the right medical supplementation to enhance gut health.

IBS Diet

To manage IBS, our providers will recommend dietary changes that limit a patient’s exposure to triggering food items and increase their absorption of nutrients that aid in gut function.

We may recommend what’s called the low FODMAP diet, which reduces certain carbohydrates and sugars (like lactose and fructose). Lowering a patient’s gluten intake may also prove useful in managing IBS flare-ups.

It’s also essential to eat enough fiber and drink enough water to keep digestion proceeding as smoothly as possible.

IBS Medication

In some cases, IBS patients require certain medications to help them manage the symptoms of IBS. At Peak Vitality, we might recommend natural supplements that serve to:
M

Reduce diarrhea

M

Reduce constipation

M

Reduce constipation

M

Ensure optimal fiber intake

M

Ease pain and cramping

M

Reduce diarrhea

M

Reduce constipation

M

Reduce constipation

M

Ensure optimal fiber intake

M

Ease pain and cramping

Our integrative team also finds that putting IBS patients on a high-quality probiotic helps to balance gut bacteria and facilitate digestion the way nature intended. Probiotics work to enhance the strength of the intestinal walls, break down nutrients for absorption, and eliminate bacteria that are harmful to the gut’s healthy biome.

IBS is a difficult, painful disorder to deal with, but fortunately, it can be managed with effective diet and lifestyle practices.

If you know or suspect that you suffer from IBS, call us at 720-504-8007 or schedule an appointment. We’ll take every possible step to recommend the best holistic care protocols for your unique needs.

Your Health Starts Here

Flexible and same-day appointments.

Or call us at 720-504-8007

Your Health Starts Here

Flexible and same-day appointments.

Or call us at 720-504-8007